Upon The Death of a Narcissistic Parent

As I write this article, I am processing my mother’s recent death and what it means for me. My inner child is asking for and needing attention. I am honoring my inner child.

I feel sad that my mother’s life has ended because now she has no more opportunities to heal, or attempt to heal, her relationships that need healing. And there are many.

The morning after her death, “The big bad wolf is gone” was the first thought to form in my waking consciousness. My inner child seems to feel safe now.

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Upon The Death of a Narcissist Parent
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As I write this article, I am processing my mother’s recent death and what it means for me. My inner child is asking for and needing attention. I am honoring my inner child. I feel sad that my mother’s life has ended because now she has no more opportunities to heal, or attempt to heal, her relationships that need healing. And there are many. The morning after her death, “The big bad wolf is gone” was the first thought to form in my waking consciousness. My inner child feels safe now. For decades I’ve struggled physically, emotionally, spiritually, and mentally with the concept of having a mother who chose solely minimal involvement with me. She was often hurtful, spiteful, and mean-spirited to me during these infrequent interactions. The continuous emotional abandonment that I experienced during those years was real. Throughout, I continually longed for and chased after her ever-withheld love, affection, and acceptance. I felt like I was lost in the woods, wandering a deep, dark, dangerous forest, unable to find my way home for so very long. Subsequently, I mourned the loss of my mother decades ago when she was very much alive. There are no more tears left to shed.
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DianeMetcalf.com
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